Social Communication, Emotional Regulation, and Transactional Support (SCERTS)

  • Emily Rubin
  • Barry M. Prizant
  • Amy C. Laurent
  • Amy M. Wetherby
Chapter

Abstract

Educational programming for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) can be described at two different levels: focused approaches and comprehensive approaches. Focused approaches utilize evidence-based strategies directed at particular symptoms. These evidence-based strategies are indeed essential for supporting individuals with ASD in relation to particular areas of need. In contrast, a comprehensive approach provides a framework that is broad in scope and is designed to improve overall functioning and to produce positive long-term outcomes in adulthood. The SCERTS® Model is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary educational approach that was developed to maximize long-term positive outcomes for individuals with ASD and their families while embracing a wide range of more focused evidence-based interventions (Prizant et al. 2006 ).

Keywords

Depression Hone Echolalia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Rubin
    • 1
  • Barry M. Prizant
    • 2
  • Amy C. Laurent
    • 3
  • Amy M. Wetherby
    • 4
  1. 1.Communication CrossroadsAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Childhood Communication ServicesCenter for the Study of Human Development, Brown UniversityCranstonUSA
  3. 3.University of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Clinical Sciences, College of MedicineFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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