Diversity, Uniformity and the Transformative Properties of the House in Neolithic Greece

Chapter
Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH)

Abstract

Traditional models of the introduction, spread and impact of the Neolithic way of life tend to assume that novel reorientations and developments are something that happens elsewhere to which people merely respond—for example, by adopting agriculture, settling down and creating permanent houses. This chapter suggests that we need to investigate the deeper structure of these pioneering societies and to reconceptualise the Neolithic house as an active social framework for life, as a context for the transformations that occur. Indeed, it is in the continually shifting relationships within and between social groups that wider developments can be best understood. This view is explored through an examination of the different manifestations of early settlement in Greece, the role and forms of houses, the interplay between the different scales of space and time at which all this happened and the range of relationships that it involved.

Keywords

Household Architecture Identity Community Production Mobility Agriculture 

References

  1. Alram-Stern, E. 2005. The early Neolithic settlement in central and southern Greece. The actual state of research. In How did farming reach Europe? Anatolian-European relations from the second half of the 7th through the first half of the 6th millennium cal BC, ed. C. Lichter, 183–194. Istanbul: Ege Yayinlari.Google Scholar
  2. Ammerman, A.J. and P. Biagi, eds. 2003. The widening harvest. The Neolithic transition in Europe: looking forward, looking back. Boston: Archaeological Institute of America.Google Scholar
  3. Andreou, S. 2005. The landscapes of modern Greek Aegean archaeology. In Prehistorians round the pond: reflections on Aegean prehistory as a discipline, eds. J.F. Cherry, D. Margomenou and L.E. Talalay, 73–92. Ann Arbor: Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan.Google Scholar
  4. Andreou, S., M. Fotiadis and K. Kotsakis. 2001. Review of Aegean prehistory V: the Neolithic and Bronze Age of northern Greece. In Aegean prehistory: a review, ed. T. Cullen, 259–327. Boston: Archaeological Institute of America (American Journal of Archaeology Supplement 1).Google Scholar
  5. Aslanis, I. 1992. I Proistoria its Makedonias I: I Neolithiki Epochi. Athens: Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity-National Research Foundation.Google Scholar
  6. Bailey, D.W., A. Whittle and V. Cummings, eds. 2005. (Un)settling the Neolithic. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  7. Bailey, D.W., A. Whittle and D. Hofmann, eds. 2008. Living well together: settlement and materiality in the Neolithic of central and southeastern Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  8. Burton, M.L., K.L. Nero and J. Hess. 2002. Who can belong to a Micronesian household: representations of household composition across social contexts. Field Methods 14:65–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Carsten, J. 1997. The heat of the hearth: the process of kinship in a Malay fishing community. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  10. Cavannagh, B. and W.J. Crouwel. 2002. The survey area in prehistoric periods. In The Laconia survey. Continuity and change in a Greek rural landscape, eds. B. Cavannagh, W.J. Crouwel, R.W.V. Catling and G. Shipley, 121–150. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  11. Chapman, J. and B. Gaydarska. 2006. Parts and wholes: fragmentation in prehistoric context. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  12. Chapman, J., B. Gaydarska, E. Skafida and S. Souvatzi. 2011. Personhood and the life cycle of Spondylus rings: an example from Late Neolithic Greece. In Spondylus in prehi s tory: new data and approaches contributions to the archaeology of shell technologies , eds. F. Ifantidis and M. Nikolaidou, 139–160. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.Google Scholar
  13. Davis, J.L. 2001. Review of Aegean prehistory I: the islands of the Aegean. In Aegean prehistory: a review, ed. T. Cullen, 19–94. Boston: Archaeological Institute of America (American Journal of Archaeology Supplement 1).Google Scholar
  14. Demoule, J.-P. and C. Perlès. 1993. The Greek Neolithic: a new review. Journal of World Prehistory 7: 355–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Edmonds, M. and C. Richards, eds. 1998. Understanding the Neolithic of north-western Europe. Glasgow: Cruithne Press.Google Scholar
  16. Efstratiou, N. 2005. Tracing the story of the first farmers in Greece—A long and winding road. In How did farming reach Europe? Anatolian-European relations from the second half of the 7th through the first half of the 6th millennium cal BC, ed. C. Lichter, 143–153. Istanbul: Ege Yayinlari.Google Scholar
  17. Efstratiou, N., M.P. Fumanal, C. Ferrer, D. Urem-Kotsou, A. Curci, A. Tagliacozzo, G. Stratouli, S.M. Valamoti, M. Dinou, E. Badal, M. Madella and K. Skourtopoulou. 1998. Excavations at the Neolithic settlement of Makri, Thrace, Greece (1988–1996). A preliminary report. Saguntum 31:11–62.Google Scholar
  18. Galanidou, N. and Perlès, C. 2003a. An introduction to the Greek Mesolithic. In The Greek Mesolithic: problems and perspectives, eds. N. Galanidou and C. Perlès, 27–32. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  19. Galanidou, N. and Perlès, C. eds. 2003b. The Greek Mesolithic: problems and perspectives. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  20. Gallis, K. 1985. A Late Neolithic foundation offering from Thessaly. Antiquity 59:20–24.Google Scholar
  21. Gallis, K. 1992. Atlas proïstorikon oikismon tis anatolikis Thessalikis pediadas. Larissa: Etaireia Istorikon Erevnon Thessalias.Google Scholar
  22. Grammenos, D.V. 1991. Neolithikes Erevnes stin Kentriki kai Anatoliki Makedonia. Athens: Archaiologiki Etaireia.Google Scholar
  23. Halstead, P. 1984. Strategies for survival: an ecological approach to social and economic change in the early farming communities of Thessaly, northern Greece. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cambridge.Google Scholar
  24. Hodder, I. ed. 2006. Çatalhöyük perspectives: themes from the 1995–1999 seasons. Cambridge and London: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research and British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara.Google Scholar
  25. Hourmouziadis, G. ed. 2002. Dispilio: 7500 Hronia Meta. Thessaloniki: University Studio Press.Google Scholar
  26. Johnson, M. and C. Perlès. 2004. An overview of Neolithic settlement patterns in eastern Thessaly. In Explaining social change: Studies in honour of Colin Renfrew, eds. J. Cherry, C. Scarre and S. Shennan, 65–79. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.Google Scholar
  27. Karimali, E. 2005. Lithic technologies and use. In The archaeology of Mediterranean prehistory, eds. E. Blake and B.A. Knapp, 180–214. Oxford: Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Kotsakis, K. 2003. From the Neolithic side: the Mesolithic/Neolithic interface in Greece. In The Greek Mesolithic: Problems and perspectives, eds. N. Galanidou and C. Perlès, 217–221. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  29. Kotsakis, K. 2005. Across the border: unstable dwellings and fluid landscapes in the earliest Neolithic of Greece. In (un)settling the Neolithic, eds. D.W. Bailey, A. Whittle and V. Cummings, 8–15. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  30. Koukouli-Chrysanthaki, C., R. Treuil and D. Malamidou. 1996. Proistorikos oikismos Philippon ‘Dikili Tash’: Deka hronia anaskafikis erevnas. Archaiologiko Ergo sti Makedonia kai Thraki 10B:681–704.Google Scholar
  31. Kuijt, I. ed. 2000. Life in Neolithic farming communities: social organisation, identity and differentiation. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.Google Scholar
  32. Lichter, C. ed. 2000. How did farming reach Europe? Anatolian-European relations from the second half of the 7th through the first half of the 6th millennium cal BC. Istanbul: Ege Yayinlari.Google Scholar
  33. Miller, M. 2003. Technical aspects of ornament production at Sitagroi. In Prehistoric Sitagroi: excavations in northeast Greece, 1968–1970, volume II, the final report, eds. E.S. Elster and C. Renfrew, 369–382. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California Press.Google Scholar
  34. Mould, C.A. and K.A. Wardle. 2000a. The architectural remains. In Servia I, eds. C. Ridley, K.A. Wardle and C.A. Mould, 71–105. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  35. Mould, C.A. and K.A. Wardle. 2000b. The stratigraphy and phases. In Servia I, eds. C. Ridley, K.A. Wardle and C.A. Mould, 17–70. London: British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  36. Pantelidou-Gofa, M. 1991. I Neolithiki Nea Makri: Ta Oikodomika. Athens: Archaiologiki Etaireia.Google Scholar
  37. Papadopoulos, S. and D. Malamidou. 2002. Oi proimes faseis katoikisis tou neolithikou oikismou ton Limenarion. Archaiologiko Ergo sti Makedonia kai Thraki 14:25–32.Google Scholar
  38. Pappa, M. and M. Besios. 1999. The Neolithic settlement at Makriyalos, northern Greece: preliminary report on the 1993–1995 excavations. Journal of Field Archaeology 26:177–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Perlès, C. 1992. Systems of exchange and organisation of production in Neolithic Greece. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 5:115–164.Google Scholar
  40. Perlès, C. 2001. The Early Neolithic in Greece. The first farming communities in Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Perlès, C. 2005. From the Near East to Greece: let’s reverse the focus. In How did farming reach Europe? Anatolian–European relations from the second half of the 7th through the first half of the 6th millennium cal BC, ed. C. Lichter, 275–290. Istanbul: Ege Yayinlari.Google Scholar
  42. Perlès, C. and K.D. Vitelli. 1999. Craft specialisation in the Greek Neolithic. In Neolithic society in Greece, ed. P. Halstead, 96–107. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press.Google Scholar
  43. Price, T.D. ed. 2000. Europe’s first farmers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Rodden, R.J. 1962. Excavations at the Early Neolithic site at Nea Nikomedeia, Greek Macedonia (1961 season). Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 28:267–288.Google Scholar
  45. Rodden, R.J. 1996. Introduction and acknowledgements. In Nea Nikomedeia I: the excavation of an Early Neolithic village in northern Greece, 1961–1964. The excavation and the ceramic assemblage, ed. K.A. Wardle, 1–8. London: The British School at Athens.Google Scholar
  46. Séfériadès, M. 2000. Spondylus gaederopus: some observations on the earliest European long distance exchange system. In Karanovo Bd. III. Beiträge zum Neolithikum in Südosteuropa, eds. S. Hiller and V. Nikolov, 423–437. Vienna: Phoibos.Google Scholar
  47. Skourtopoulou, K. 1998. Technical behaviour and the identification of social patterning: a preliminary discussion of some new evidence from the Late Neolithic of northern Greece. In Craft specialisation: operational sequences and beyond, eds. S. Milliken and M. Vidale, 9–16. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.Google Scholar
  48. Skourtopoulou, K. 2002. Oi lithotechnies apolepismenou lithou apo ton oikismo tis Stavroupolis. In Sostikes Anaskafes sto Neolithiko Oikismo Stavroupolis Thessalonikis, eds. D.V. Grammenos and S. Kotsos, 537–559. Thessaloniki: Dimosievmata tou Archaiologikou Institoutou Voreias Elladas, no. 2.Google Scholar
  49. Skourtopoulou, K. 2004. I lithotechnia tou apokrousmenou lithou ston oikismo tis Stavroupolis. In Sostikes Anaskafes sto Neolithiko Oikismo Stavroupolis Thessalonikis, Part II, eds. D.V. Grammenos and S. Kotsos, 361–476. Thessaloniki: Dimosievmata tou Archaiologikou Institoutou Voreias Elladas, no. 6.Google Scholar
  50. Skourtopoulou, K. 2006. Questioning spatial contexts: the contribution of lithic studies as analytical and interpretative bodies of data. In Deconstructing context. A critical approach to archaeological practice, ed. D. Papaconstantinou, 50–78. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  51. Solien de González, N. 1969. Black Carib household structure: a study of migration and modernisation. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
  52. Souvatzi, S. 2008a. A social archaeology of households in Neolithic Greece. An anthropological approach. New York and Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  53. Souvatzi, S. 2008b. Household dynamics and variability in the Neolithic of Greece: the case for a bottom-up approach. In Living well together: settlement and materiality in the Neolithic of central and southeastern Europe, eds. D.W Bailey, A. Whittle and D. Hofmann, 17–27. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  54. Souvatzi, S. 2011. Between the individual and the collective: household as a social process in Neolithic Greece. In Household archaeology: new perspectives from the Near East and beyond, eds. B.J. Parker and C.P. Foster. Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
  55. Souvatzi, S. and E. Skafida. 2003. Neolithic communities and symbolic meaning: perceptions and expressions of social and symbolic structures at Dimini, Thessaly. In Early symbolic systems for communication in southeast Europe, ed. L. Nikolova, 429–441. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.Google Scholar
  56. Stratouli, G. 2005. Symbolic behaviour at places of social activity beyond the domestic area in the Ionian Neolithic. Documenta Praehistorica 32:123–132.Google Scholar
  57. Tomkins, P. 2004. Filling in the ‘Neolithic background’: social life and social transformation in the Aegean before the Bronze Age. In The emergence of civilisation revisited, eds. J.C. Barrett and P. Halstead, 38–63. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
  58. Toufexis, G. 1996. House models. In Neolithic culture in Greece, ed. G. Papathanassopoulos, 161–162. Athens: Goulandris Foundation.Google Scholar
  59. Toufexis, G. 2005. Anatoliki parakampsi Larissas, neolithiki thesi sto koinotiko diamerisma tis Galenes, Dimos Platykambou. Archaiologiko Deltio 54:424–426.Google Scholar
  60. Toufexis, G. 2006. I limni Karla (Voiviis) kai i anaskafi ston proistoiko oikismo sti thesi Palioskala. Prota syberasmata kai prooptikes. Archaiologiko Ergo Thessalias kai Stereas Elladas 1:55–70.Google Scholar
  61. Toufexis, G. and E. Skafida. 1998. Neolithic house models from Thessaly, Greece. International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences, XIII Congress Proceedings, eds. C. Pereto and C. Giunchi, 339–346. Forlì: A.B.A.C.O. Edizioni.Google Scholar
  62. Treuil, R. and P. Darcque. 1998. Un ‘bucrane’ néolithique à Dikili Tash (Macédonie orientale): parellèles et perspectives d’ interpretation. Bulletin de Correspondance Hellenique 122:1–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Treuil, R. and Z. Tsirtsoni. 2000. Late Neolithic houses at Dikili Tash: a contextual approach. In Karanovo Bd. III, Beiträge zum Neolithikum in Südosteuropa, eds. S. Hiller and V. Nikolov, 213–216. Vienna: Phoibos.Google Scholar
  64. Triantaphyllou, S. 1999. Prehistoric Makriyalos: a story from the fragments. In Neolithic society in Greece, ed. P. Halstead, 128–135. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press.Google Scholar
  65. Whittle, A. 2003. An archaeology of people. Dimensions of Neolithic life. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  66. Whittle A. and V. Cummings, eds. 2007. Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-west Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Wiseman, J. and K. Zachos, eds. 2003. Landscape archaeology in southern Epirus, Greece I. Athens: The American School of Classical Studies in Athens (Hesperia Supplement 32).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hellenic Open UniversityAthensGreece

Personalised recommendations