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Tides of Change? The House through the Irish Neolithic

Chapter
Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH)

Abstract

A relatively small island on the very edge of Atlantic Europe, Ireland has traditionally been viewed as one of the last settings for the Neolithic ‘revolution’. Part of this transformation involved the construction of rectangular and substantial timber houses, which have yielded evidence for depositional patterning, and for construction, maintenance and abandonment events. Perhaps most importantly, they are strikingly homogenous in size, shape and materials, suggesting they represented a fixed, even ideal, form of cultural expression. However, after approximately a century they were replaced by a much more ephemeral settlement record. This chapter explores the role of houses in Irish Neolithic society, examining their sudden island-wide appearance (and subsequent disappearance) and the implications for travel, connection and communication in early prehistoric Europe.

Keywords

Identity Timber houses Early Neolithic Bayesian modelling Mortuary architecture Robust Ephemeral Grooved Ware 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Organic Geochemistry Unit, School of ChemistryUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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