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Sara Roelofse, Matron of New Amsterdam

Chapter

Abstract

Sara Roelofse was born in the Netherlands, came to the New Netherlands as a small child, and spent the rest of her life there. Thrice married, she raised a large family while participating in the social and economic life of the community both before and after New Amsterdam became New York City. This chapter discusses her roles as a matron of the city through the evidence left in her will and two pieces of material culture associated with her: a bake house and a bodkin.

Keywords

Bake Good Cultural Broker Native American Language Enslave Laborer Enslave People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.URS CorporationBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.School of Visual ArtsNew YorkUSA

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