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Calibration and Validation Scheme for In Vivo Spectroscopic Imaging of Tissue Oxygenation

  • Maritoni Litorja
  • Robert Chang
  • Jeeseong Hwang
  • David W. Allen
  • Karel Zuzak
  • Eleanor Wehner
  • Sara Best
  • Edward Livingston
  • Jeffrey Cadeddu
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 765)

Abstract

The determination of the level of oxygenation in optically accessible tissues using multispectral or hyperspectral imaging (HSI) of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin has special appeal in clinical work due to its noninvasiveness, ease of use, and capability of providing molecular and anatomical information at near video rates during surgery. In this paper we refer to an example of the use of HSI in monitoring oxygenation of kidneys during partial nephrectomy. In a study using porcine models, it was found that artery-only clamping left the kidney better oxygenated, as opposed to simultaneously clamping the artery and the vein. A subsequent study correlates gradations in blood flow by partial clamping during the surgical procedure with postoperative renal function via assessment of creatinine level. We discuss the various contributions to the uncertainty of the oxygen saturation measured by this remote-sensing imaging technique in medical application.

Keywords

Spectroscopic imaging Tissue oxygenation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The NIST work is funded by the NIST Innovations in Measurement Science Award. The clinical research is funded by the UTSW Dept. of Urology.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maritoni Litorja
    • 1
  • Robert Chang
    • 1
  • Jeeseong Hwang
    • 1
  • David W. Allen
    • 1
  • Karel Zuzak
    • 2
  • Eleanor Wehner
    • 3
  • Sara Best
    • 3
  • Edward Livingston
    • 3
  • Jeffrey Cadeddu
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  2. 2.Digital Light InnovationsDallasUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA

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