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Effect of Spinal Anesthesia for Elective Cesarean Section on Cerebral Blood Oxygenation Changes: Comparison of Hyperbaric and Isobaric Bupivacaine

  • Yuko Kondo
  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Noriya Hirose
  • Takeshi Maeda
  • Jitsu Kato
  • Setsuro Ogawa
  • Yoichi Katayama
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 765)

Abstract

We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to evaluate cerebral blood oxygenation changes in subjects undergoing cesarean section under spinal anesthesia (SP) with hyperbaric bupivacaine (group H, 27 subjects) or isobaric bupivacaine (group I, 15 subjects). In group H, total-Hb, oxy-Hb, and mean blood pressure (MBP) within 20 min after SP were significantly lower than the baseline values. In contrast, there was no significant change from baseline in total-Hb, oxy-Hb, or MBP in group I after SP. Total-Hb and MBP in group H were significantly lower than those in group I within 10 min after SP. There was no significant change of deoxy-Hb, tissue oxygen index, or heart rate from baseline in either of the groups. These results suggest that isobaric bupivacaine may be superior to hyperbaric bupivacaine for preventing a decrease of maternal cerebral blood flow after SP for cesarean section.

Keywords

Cesarean Bupivacaine 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was partly supported by Japan Science and Technology Agency, under the Strategic Promotion of Innovative Research and Development Program, and a Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Sciences and Technology of Japan (B23300247).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuko Kondo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 3
  • Noriya Hirose
    • 2
  • Takeshi Maeda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jitsu Kato
    • 2
  • Setsuro Ogawa
    • 2
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Anesthesiology, Department of AnesthesiologyNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Optical Brain Engineering, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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