Introduction: Making the Case for Culturally Responsive School Mental Health

  • Caroline S. Clauss-Ehlers
  • Zewelanji N. Serpell
  • Mark D. Weist
Chapter

Abstract

For over two decades, the school mental health (SMH) movement has shown progressive growth in the United States (U.S.) and other countries based on some straightforward and compelling realities. First, child and adolescent mental health is among the most neglected of all health care needs, with 20 % or more of children and youth presenting more concerning emotional and behavioral challenges, but less than one-third of these youth receiving any services (President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003). Moreover, for those youth who do receive services there are serious questions about the quality of services received, with true evidence-based practice (EBP) being relatively rare, quality improvement often focused on variables such as fee-for-service productivity, and nonevidence based, even harmful services being widespread (see Evans & Weist, 2004; Weist et al., 2007).

Keywords

Depression Social Stratification Arena Alan Plague 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caroline S. Clauss-Ehlers
    • 1
  • Zewelanji N. Serpell
    • 2
  • Mark D. Weist
    • 3
  1. 1.Rutgers, The State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Virginia State UniversityPetersburgUSA
  3. 3.University of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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