Teachers Learning from Teachers

  • Allan Leslie White
  • Barbara Jaworski
  • Cecilia Agudelo-Valderrama
  • Zahra Gooya
Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 27)

Abstract

There is much debate within mathematics teacher education over ways in which professional and academic foci could be made to complement each other. On the one hand, teachers’ craft knowledge is emphasized, mainly as this relates to the particular and local level of teaching; on the other hand, the importance of academic subject knowledge cannot be denied. In this chapter the focus will be on how to blend and balance the two through activities in which teachers learn from other teachers, particularly the co-learning of teachers and teacher educators. It will discuss professional relationships, reflective practice, community building, and research in practice. Examples of research-based programs involving lesson study (LS) and the Learners Perspective Study (LPS) have moved the relevant research in this area to yet another level, in which theory and practice are combined. Projects such as these and others from diverse parts of the world will be presented and discussed.

Keywords

Malaysia Stake Indonesia Metaphor Colombia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan Leslie White
    • 1
  • Barbara Jaworski
    • 2
  • Cecilia Agudelo-Valderrama
    • 3
  • Zahra Gooya
    • 4
  1. 1.University of Western SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Loughborough UniversityLeicestershireUK
  3. 3.CONACES—Ministerio de Educación Nacional, ColombiaBogotaColombia
  4. 4.Shahid Beheshti UniversityTehranIran

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