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Gangliosides of the Neuron: Localization and Origin

  • R. W. Ledeen
  • J. A. Skrivanek
  • L. J. Tirri
  • R. K. Margolis
  • R. U. Margolis
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 71)

Abstract

Regional differences in ganglioside content of brain tissue were noted in the early explorations of this subject. Working with normal brain, Klenk and Langerbeins (1) could demonstrate the presence of gangliosides in gray matter only, while Svennerholm (2) reported a 5-fold difference in dry weight concentration between cerebral cortex and white matter of human adults. This general pattern was confirmed in many subsequent studies (3,4,5) and led to the concept of gangliosides as primarily neuron-associated lipids in brain. It was therefore surprising to find that neurons isolated in bulk quantity had a ganglioside content only half that of astrocytes obtained from the same sample of brain (6,7). A higher concentration was found in the hand-dissected Deiter’s neurons from ox brain stem (8) but even this value was below that of whole gray matter. Similarly, a neuron preparation from pig brain stem gave a concentration of ganglioside NANA well below that of pig gray matter (9).

Keywords

Sialic Acid Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Ending Superior Colliculus Axonal Transport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

LGN

lateral geniculate body

SC

superior colliculus

C-I

contralateral-ipsilateral

NANA

N-acetylneuraminic acid

GLC

gas-liquid chromatography

TLC

thin layer chromatography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Ledeen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. A. Skrivanek
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. J. Tirri
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. K. Margolis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. U. Margolis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and BiochemistryAlbert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology, Downstate Medical CenterState University of New YorkBrooklynUSA
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologyNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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