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Rat Brain Gangliosides Following Drug Addiction and Nutritional Deficiency

  • Roland J. Boegman
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 71)

Abstract

Gangliosides are found in highest concentration in neural tissue and appear to be concentrated in nerve endings (1). As such they may he important in the process of neurotransmission (2) or may play a role in membrane receptors (3) which mediate drug action.

Keywords

Sialic Acid Opiate Receptor Morphine Withdrawal Narcotic Drug Brain Ganglioside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roland J. Boegman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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