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Short-Term Climate Variation

  • Antony Cooke
Chapter
Part of the Astronomers' Universe book series (ASTRONOM)

Abstract

Much has been made of possible variations in the climate over the past 1,000 years, with strong arguments presented on both sides. Such variations in climate have been indicated in many types of historical (proxy) records, and to some degree reported in literature, with extended periods theorized as substantially warmer and colder than those of today. However, some researchers continue to question exactly what took place, if indeed, anything did at all. This is simply because of the lack of consistent and reliable records; proxy data is all we have.

Keywords

Solar Activity Solar Cycle Solar Irradiance Cold Period Total Solar Irradiance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antony Cooke
    • 1
  1. 1.Dana PointUSA

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