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LGBT Parents and Their Children: Non-Western Research and Perspectives

  • Carien Lubbe

Abstract

The main aim of the chapter is to provide an entry point to access non-Western perspectives on LGBT parents and their children. An overview of available research from certain geographical regions is presented. Findings from South Africa, Africa, South and Latin-America, Eastern Europe, and Israel are explored, with attention to commonalities across these regions, as well as the contextual specifics of each country. Themes that emerged as relevant across all countries are the interactions among gender, parenting, and sexuality; heteronormativity and parenthood; the role of legal and political policies and frameworks; and the role of religion. Against the backdrop of global change, modernistic and traditionalist worlds, this chapter explores the presence and possibility of lesbian- and gay-parent families in Non-Westernized societies.

Keywords

Lesbian Woman Lesbian Couple Lesbian Mother Woman Marriage Heteronormative Assumption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa

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