Advertisement

Effects of Membrane Composition and Cytoskeletal Proteins on Membrane Mechanics

  • Nima Khatibzadeh
  • Brenda Farrell
  • William E. Brownell
  • Bahman Anvari
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

We pull plasma membrane nanotubes (tethers) from living human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells using optical tweezers. Time-resolved force profiling provides us information on membrane tether formation force and energy, and membrane tether equilibrium force. We modulate the membrane composition by modifying its cholesterol content using Cyclodextrins, and correlate the mechanical properties to the cholesterol content. To discern the effects of cytoskelatal proteins, we perform the experiments using HEK cells with intact and disrupted F-actin. Our data suggest the significance of membrane composition, specifically membrane cholesterol content, and cytoskeletal proteins, specifically F-actin on membrane mechanical properties as well as membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion.

Keywords

Cell Cholesterol Energy F-actin Optical tweezers 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge our funding agencies: NSF-BES-0522862, NIH-2R01-DC02775 and support provided by Bourns College of Engineering and the Bioengineering Center at University of California, Riverside.

References

  1. 1.
    Fletcher DA, Mullins RD (2010) Cell mechanics and the cytoskeleton. Nature 463(7280):485–492CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Doherty GJ, McMahon HT (2008) Mediation, modulation, and consequences of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. Annu Rev Biophys 37(1):65–95CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Alberts B et al (2002) Molecular biology of the cell, 4th edn. Garland Science, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Oh H et al (2009) Membrane cholesterol is a biomechanical regulator of neutrophil adhesion. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 29(9):1290–1297CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Edmondson KE, Denney WS, Diamond SL (2005) Neutrophil-bead collision assay: pharmacologically induced changes in membrane mechanics regulate the PSGL-1/P-selectin adhesion lifetime. Biophys J 89(5):3603–3614CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sun M et al (2007) The effect of cellular cholesterol on membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion. J Cell Sci 120(13):2223–2231CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Byfield FJ et al (2004) Cholesterol depletion increases membrane stiffness of aortic endothelial cells. Biophys J 87(5):3336–3343CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ermilov SA et al (2005) Effects of salicylate on plasma membrane mechanics. J Neurophysiol 94(3):2105–2110CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Murdock DR et al (2005) Effects of chlorpromazine on mechanical properties of the outer hair cell plasma membrane. Biophys J 89(6):4090–4095CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ermilov SA et al (2007) Studies of plasma membrane mechanics and plasma membrane†cytoskeleton interactions using optical tweezers and fluorescence imaging. J Biomech 40(2):476–480CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Sfondouris J et al (2008) Membrane composition modulates prestin-associated charge movement. J Biol Chem 283(33):22473–22481CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zidovetzki R, Levitan I (2007) Use of cyclodextrins to manipulate plasma membrane cholesterol content: evidence, misconceptions and control strategies. Biochim Biophys Acta (BBA) Biomembranes 1768(6):1311–1324CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Spector I et al (1989) Latrunculins – novel marine macrolides that disrupt microfilament organization and affect cell growth: I. Comparison with cytochalasin D. Cell Motil Cytoskel 13(3):127–144MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nima Khatibzadeh
    • 1
  • Brenda Farrell
    • 2
  • William E. Brownell
    • 2
  • Bahman Anvari
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of California-RiversideRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Baylor College of Medicine, Department of OtolaryngologyHead and Neck SurgeryHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of BioengineeringUniversity of California-RiversideRiversideUSA

Personalised recommendations