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Why This Book? An Introduction

  • Niel Hens
  • Ziv Shkedy
  • Marc Aerts
  • Christel Faes
  • Pierre Van Damme
  • Philippe Beutels
Chapter
Part of the Statistics for Biology and Health book series (SBH, volume 63)

Abstract

For the sake of simplicity, let us start by naming an infectious agent a “germ.” There are countless germs that can infect human, animal, and plant hosts. Germs can be transmitted directly between hosts via respiratory air droplets or bodily fluids (e.g., saliva, blood, or secretions from sexual organs). Germs can also be transmitted indirectly through an intermediary source, for instance via mosquitoes, ticks, rodents, environmental particles (e.g., contaminated water and food) or contaminated blood products. Germs evolve and transform while new germs emerge regularly, implying their supply can be considered infinite. A broad distinction is often made between microscopically small germs with relatively short life spans, which replicate within their hosts (often called microparasites such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi), and much larger germs with relatively longer life spans (often called macroparasites such as parasitic worms). Many germs live inside or on the surface of their hosts’ bodies without causing illness or even discomfort.

Keywords

Basic Reproduction Number Longe Life Span Parasitic Worm Environmental Particle Infectious Disease Modeling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Niel Hens
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ziv Shkedy
    • 1
  • Marc Aerts
    • 1
  • Christel Faes
    • 1
  • Pierre Van Damme
    • 3
  • Philippe Beutels
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Statistics, Interuniversity Institute for Biostatistics and statistical BioinformaticsHasselt UniversityDiepenbeekBelgium
  2. 2.Centre for Health Economic Research and Modelling Infectious Diseases, Vaccine and Infectious Disease InstituteUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpenBelgium
  3. 3.Centre for the Evaluation of Vaccination, Vaccine and Infectious Disease InstituteUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpenBelgium
  4. 4.Centre for Health Economic Research and Modelling Infectious Diseases, Vaccine and Infectious Disease InstituteUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpenBelgium

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