Radiation Regulations and Protection

Chapter

Abstract

Radiation hazards to humans are well documented. To minimize their risks, international and national organizations have been established to set guidelines for safe handling of radiations. As mentioned in Chap.  15, the ICRP and NCRP are two such organizations. They make recommendations and guidelines for radiation workers to follow in handling radiations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and state agencies adopt many of these recommendations into regulations to implement radiation protection programs in the United States. The NRC regulations are published in the Federal Register in the form of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The regulations pertinent to the practices of nuclear medicine are briefly described here.

Keywords

Dust Welding Cadmium Transportation Fluoride 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Cleveland Clinic FoundationEmeritus StaffClevelandUSA

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