How to Write an Effective Journal Article Review

Chapter

Abstract

The experience of reviewing manuscripts for scientific journals is an important one in professional development. Reviewing articles gives trainees familiarity with the peer review process in ways that facilitate their writing. For example, reviewing manuscripts can help students and early career psychologists understand what reviewers and editors look for in a peer-reviewed article and ways to critique and enhance a manuscript based on peer review. Experiences in review can facilitate early career faculty with early entry into and experience being a reviewer for a professional journal. The experience of journal reviews also gives students a broader connection to the field of science in areas of their primary professional interest. At the same time reviewing articles for scientific journals poses a number of difficult challenges (see Hyman, 1995; Drotar, 2000a, 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2009d, 2010, 2011; Lovejoy, Revenson, & France, 2011). The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to the review process and give step by step guidance in conducting reviews for scientific journals. Interested readers might wish to read Lovejoy et al.’s (2011) primer for manuscript review, which contains annotated examples of reviews and an editor’s decision letter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Drotar
    • 1
  • Yelena P. Wu
    • 2
  • Jennifer M. Rohan
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical PsychologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical PsychologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Department of PsychologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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