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Measuring Resilience in Children: From Theory to Practice

Abstract

The concept of resilience, like all psychological constructs, must have certain characteristics in order to be subjected to experimental testing so as to be effectively applied to benefit our constituency. A primary characteristic is that resilience must be operationally defined in a way that is reliable across time, subjects, and researchers. Once a concept is operationalized in a reliable manner, then its validity can be examined. When we have sufficiently operationalized the concept of resilience, and there is evidence that it can be measured in a reliable and valid way, then application in clinical and educational settings becomes possible. This is an ideal sequence for the development tools for testing new concepts, but it is not how many concepts and tests used in education and psychology have been promulgated.

Keywords

  • Protective Factor
  • Strength Index
  • Percentile Rank
  • Psychometric Characteristic
  • Emotional Competence

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

We write this chapter in order to provide essential information about measurement of resilience and the tools that are currently available for that purpose. It is important for the reader to recognize that the first two authors of this chapter are authors of several of the scales included here. In order to provide as complete a view as possible of all the scales currently available for measuring protective factors, we also included scales developed by other authors. We have, therefore, limited any evaluative comments about these scales but do provide a factual presentation of their characteristics. It is our expectation that this information will provide readers sufficient information to arrive at their own conclusions regarding the relative advantages and disadvantages of these tools.

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Fig. 14.1
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Correspondence to Jack A. Naglieri .

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Naglieri, J.A., LeBuffe, P.A., Ross, K.M. (2013). Measuring Resilience in Children: From Theory to Practice. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-3661-4_14

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