Radiation Safety in X-Ray Densitometry

  • Sydney Lou Bonnick
  • Lori Ann Lewis
Chapter

Abstract

X-ray densitometers expose patients to extremely small amounts of radiation in comparison to plain X-ray techniques. These amounts are often so small that they are biologically insignificant. Similarly, the technologist operating an X-ray densitometer on a regular basis is extremely unlikely to be exposed to a significant amount of radiation. Nevertheless, no amount of radiation should be considered inconsequential. The principle of “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) should always be given the highest priority in the operation of these devices.

Keywords

Microwave Lithium Osteoporosis Leukemia Corticosteroid 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sydney Lou Bonnick
    • 1
  • Lori Ann Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Research Center of North TexasDentonUSA

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