Advertisement

Grantsmanship

  • Robert L. Shewfelt
Chapter
  • 1.6k Downloads

Abstract

Grants are the lifeblood of any scientific investigator at a university. It is almost impossible for an Assistant Professor with a research appointment in Food-Science to be promoted and tenured without obtaining grants. Grants are needed to purchase new equipment, fund graduate students, and grind out publications. The politics of obtaining funds from industry and government are somewhat different, but both require justification and written reports to obtain the necessary monetary support to run a lab. In industry, funding tends to be directed at reducing operating expenses or generating profit for the company although some companies still retain a basic research component that serves as a long-range incubator of product ideas and a status symbol. Government tends to operate more like universities but with a more rigid structure of project proposals, periodic reporting, and performance review. The rest of the chapter will be devoted to grant writing by university researchers, but both business entities and governmental researchers may be involved in pursuing federal grants. Industry scientists may never write a formal grant proposal, but they may be required to serve as liaison to a university project being funded by their company. Likewise, a governmental scientist may be asked to review grant proposals by various agencies.

Keywords

Grant Fund Federal Grant Match Fund Monetary Support Panel Director 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Blackburn TR (2003) Getting science grants: effective strategies for funding success. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CAGoogle Scholar
  2. Chapin PG (2004) Research projects and research proposals: a guide for scientists seeking funding. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UKGoogle Scholar
  3. Ries A, Trout J (2000) Positioning; The battle for your mind. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Rosei F, Johnston T (2006) Survival skills for scientists. Imperial College Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  5. Sheely D, Poth M, Jerkins D (2010) AFRI 2009 Annual Synopsis, USDAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Shewfelt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science & Technology Food Process Research & Development LaboratoryUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

Personalised recommendations