Child and Adolescent Community Psychiatry

Chapter

Abstract

The practice of child and adolescent psychiatry, when done well, can be said to be inherently community psychiatry. Child and adolescent psychiatry covers biological growth and psychological development, but its focus is also on social development. Children are born into families. How a family receives a child and adapts to changing social needs as the child is nurtured toward adulthood is a prime determinate of a young person’s mental health. Child development from the earliest months involves dealing with strangers, discovering peers, learning to share, learning to learn by sitting still at school, coping with the social aspects of puberty and eventually developing ever more capacity for autonomy within the larger social order. All such developmental steps are imbedded squarely in family and community.

Keywords

Depression Assure Hone Amaze Terrell 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services DivisionKing County Mental HealthSeattleUSA

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