Colposcopic Appearance of HPV Infection

  • Santiago Dexeus
  • Montserrat Cararach
  • Damian Dexeus
Chapter

Abstract

Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is currently a very significant topic from a public health and social perspective. As a result of the remarkable impact on the mass media through which sensational opinion has been spread, the general public has been confused. The scientific community should be aware of the epidemiological and oncogenic aspects of HPV genotypes, the complexity of the clinical spectrum, and the oncogenic potential and treatment-related difficulties associated with some types of HPV.

Keywords

Adenocarcinoma Iodine Alba Crest Candidiasis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Santiago Dexeus
    • 1
  • Montserrat Cararach
    • 1
  • Damian Dexeus
    • 1
  1. 1.Gynaecological Center Santiago DexeusBarcelonaSpain

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