Friction and Wear

  • Pradeep L. Menezes
  • Michael Nosonovsky
  • Satish V. Kailas
  • Michael R. Lovell
Chapter

Abstract

Friction is a universal phenomenon which is observed in a great variety of sliding and rolling situations. The study of friction and wear has long been of enormous practical importance, since the functioning of many mechanical, electromechanical, and biological systems depends on the appropriate friction and wear values. In recent decades, this field has received increasing attention as it has become evident that the consumption of resources resulting from high friction and wear is greater than 6 % of the Gross National Product of the USA. In this chapter, various theories, mechanisms, and factors affecting of friction and wear were discussed.

Keywords

Entropy Fatigue Titanium Anisotropy Depression 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pradeep L. Menezes
    • 1
  • Michael Nosonovsky
    • 1
  • Satish V. Kailas
    • 2
  • Michael R. Lovell
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

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