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Pain and Spirituality

  • Allen R. Dyer
  • Richard L. Stieg
Chapter

Abstract

Teaching in the field of pain medicine seems to be dominated by emphasis on pain as a symptom. This is a natural response to the scientism that dominates our medical training, thinking, and practice. The topic of pain and spirituality affords us the opportunity to refocus our attention on the multidimensional aspects of the pain experience, as many have so eloquently done before. We introduce our topic by posing several questions: How important is spirituality in the lives of patients? How important is the spirituality in the lives of physicians? What role does spirituality play in health/wellness, recovery from illness, and relief from suffering? How can physicians attend to patients’ spiritual needs? Can we understand some concepts of spiritual experience in neurophysiological terms? Can such understanding help bridge the gap between the scientific and the spiritual?

Keywords

Spiritual Experience Natural Evil Intercessory Prayer Harvard Study Healing Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Academy of Pain Medicine 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Medical CorpsWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.DenverUSA

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