Advertisement

Economic and Business Perspectives

Chapter
Part of the Electronic Materials: Science & Technology book series (EMST, volume 102)

Abstract

Photoelectrochemical water splitting could become an important contributor to the production of hydrogen and so provide a route to the storage of solar energy, but is not yet commercially viable. Improved materials are needed. To produce hydrogen for less than $3/kg, so as to be able to compete with existing energy sources, system costs of $160/m2, for a 10% efficient material requiring less than 0.8 V bias with 15 years durability would be needed.

Keywords

Hydrogen Production Capital Cost Hedge Fund Target Price Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Leggett, J.: Half Gone: Oil, Gas, Hot Air and the Global Energy Crisis. Portobello Books Ltd, London (2006)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy: International Energy Outlook 2009. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  3. 3.
    Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Chapter 7: Transportation Sector Energy Consumption. U.S. Department of Energy: International Energy Outlook 2009. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  4. 4.
    Wikipedia: Peak Oil. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_oil. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  5. 5.
    Campbell, C.J.: The Coming Oil Crisis. Multi-Science Publishing Co. Ltd. & Petroconsultants S.A, Essex (1997)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): Renewable Resource Data Center – the solar resource. http://www.nrel.gov/rredc/solar_resource.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  7. 7.
    Wikipedia: The Energy Policy Act of 2005. Accessed 1 Nov 2010Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    CNN Money.com: Gas prices around the world. http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  9. 9.
    Kogen, A.: Direct solar thermal splitting of water and on-site separation of the products. II. Experimental feasibility study. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 23, 89–98 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Perkins, C., Welmer, A.: Likely near-term solar-thermal water splitting. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 29, 1587–1599 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wikipedia: Electrolysis of Water. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis_of_water. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  12. 12.
    National Research Council: The Hydrogen Economy – Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs. The National Academies Press, Washington DC (2004)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lindsay, I., Lowe, C., Reddy, S., Bhakta, M., Balkenende, S.: Designing a climate friendly hydrogen plant. Energy Proc. 1, 4095–4102 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hamdan, M.: Low cost, high pressure hydrogen generator. 2008 Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting, pp. 2 (2008)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Stored Solar LtdReadingUK

Personalised recommendations