Economic and Business Perspectives

Chapter
Part of the Electronic Materials: Science & Technology book series (EMST, volume 102)

Abstract

Photoelectrochemical water splitting could become an important contributor to the production of hydrogen and so provide a route to the storage of solar energy, but is not yet commercially viable. Improved materials are needed. To produce hydrogen for less than $3/kg, so as to be able to compete with existing energy sources, system costs of $160/m2, for a 10% efficient material requiring less than 0.8 V bias with 15 years durability would be needed.

Keywords

Combustion Methane Steam Transportation Hydrocarbon 

References

  1. 1.
    Leggett, J.: Half Gone: Oil, Gas, Hot Air and the Global Energy Crisis. Portobello Books Ltd, London (2006)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, U.S. Department of Energy: International Energy Outlook 2009. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  3. 3.
    Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Chapter 7: Transportation Sector Energy Consumption. U.S. Department of Energy: International Energy Outlook 2009. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  4. 4.
    Wikipedia: Peak Oil. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_oil. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  5. 5.
    Campbell, C.J.: The Coming Oil Crisis. Multi-Science Publishing Co. Ltd. & Petroconsultants S.A, Essex (1997)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): Renewable Resource Data Center – the solar resource. http://www.nrel.gov/rredc/solar_resource.html. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  7. 7.
    Wikipedia: The Energy Policy Act of 2005. Accessed 1 Nov 2010Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    CNN Money.com: Gas prices around the world. http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  9. 9.
    Kogen, A.: Direct solar thermal splitting of water and on-site separation of the products. II. Experimental feasibility study. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 23, 89–98 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Perkins, C., Welmer, A.: Likely near-term solar-thermal water splitting. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 29, 1587–1599 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wikipedia: Electrolysis of Water. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis_of_water. Accessed 1 Nov 2010
  12. 12.
    National Research Council: The Hydrogen Economy – Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs. The National Academies Press, Washington DC (2004)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lindsay, I., Lowe, C., Reddy, S., Bhakta, M., Balkenende, S.: Designing a climate friendly hydrogen plant. Energy Proc. 1, 4095–4102 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hamdan, M.: Low cost, high pressure hydrogen generator. 2008 Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting, pp. 2 (2008)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Stored Solar LtdReadingUK

Personalised recommendations