Evidence-Based Intelligence Practices: Examining the Role of Fusion Centers as a Critical Source of Information

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Evidence-Based Crime Policy book series (SSEBCP, volume 3)

Abstract

Evidence-Based Intelligence Practices: Examining the Role of Fusion Centers as a Critical Source of Information

Despite dramatic changes in the intelligence infrastructure and the growth of fusion centers following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and the acknowledgement that local intelligence is critical to the prevention and deterrence of terrorist acts, very little research exists in this area generally and there has been little consideration about the development of evidence-based practices in the intelligence area. This chapter draws from fusion center personnel survey data to consider three important issues related to enhancing evidence-based practices within fusion centers. First, we consider the current state of information sharing and communication among agencies and fusion centers. This is important in that it establishes a need to identify best practices for enhancing the flow of good intelligence and considering obstacles by documenting the current experiences of state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in building an intelligence capacity. Second, we explore the type of information, data, and analysis currently used within fusion centers. We are particularly interested in providing a general picture of where fusion centers gather their information and how this information is analyzed with respect to counterterrorism efforts. Third, we discuss opportunities for research-practitioner partnerships, and present ideas and opportunities in which scholarly attention to intelligence issues and terrorism generally could enhance understanding of intelligence practices and move us toward a more scientific approach to the study of law enforcement intelligence.

Keywords

Explosive Expense Posit Arena Harness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Criminology and Criminal JusticeUniversity of North FloridaJacksonvilleUSA
  2. 2.School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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