Technologies of Entertainment

Chapter
Part of the The Economics of Information, Communication and Entertainment book series (ECOINFORM, volume 3)

Abstract

Historically, Hollywood has adopted a complex and to a certain extent ambivalent attitude toward emerging media and entertainment technologies, as they were made available. Chapter 7 identifies communication technology revolutions as potentially disruptive changes in the entertainment landscape, and analyzes the evolving regulatory environment and issues, as the rise of non-authorized diffusion of entertainment content in a digital environment.

Keywords

Silent Movie Marketing Arena Conglomerate Stake 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Annenberg School for Communication & JournalismUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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