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Acuted Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

  • Joy B. ParrishEmail author
  • E. Ann Yeh
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 724)

Abstract

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by an acute event, typically with encephalopathy, in which diffuse CNS involvement occurs. It may follow an infectious event and occurs more commonly in young children. Pulse steroid treatment is frequently used to treat ADEM. Although ADEM is typically described as a benign condition, with children generally recovering motor function and resolution of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), residual cognitive deficits may occur. This chapter aims to review the clinical features, typical presentation, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ADEM.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Neurodegenerative Disease Optic Neuritis Borrelia Burgdorferi Therapeutic Plasma Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jacobs Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine and Biomedical SciencesUniversity at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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