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Vasohibin-1 and Retinal Pigment Epithelium

  • Yumi Ishikawa
  • Nobuhiro Nagai
  • Hideyuki Onami
  • Norihiro Kumasaka
  • Ryosuke Wakusawa
  • Hikaru Sonoda
  • Yasufumi Sato
  • Toshiaki AbeEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 723)

Abstract

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main factors for inducing choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is one of the main sources for expressing VEGF. Vasohibin-1 is a VEGF-inducible gene in human cultured endothelial cells with antiangiogenic properties. We examined the effects of vasohibin-1 against RPE. We used rat RPE cell line, RPE-J. Cobalt chloride and low glucose and oxygen supply were used for hypoxic stress. Western blot analysis and real-time PCR were performed to detect the expression of vasohibin-1 and VEGF in the RPE-J. Cobalt chloride or low oxygen and low glucose enhanced VEGF expression, whereas statistically significant less vasohibin-1 expression was observed. RPE cell dynamics was monitored using xCELLigence System for real-time cell analysis during culture. External VEGF (0.2–2 nM) enhanced Cell Index (CI), such as cell viability, number, and adhesion to the plates significantly at 2% oxygen and no glucose when compared to those of vehicle or other concentration of VEGF. Conversely, external vasohibin-1 (2 nM) showed lower CI at the indicated condition. Vasohibin-1 also reduced VEGF-induced CI index. These results were not observed under standard culture condition. When we performed MTS assay or cell count, external vasohibin-1 also showed comparable results. When we transduced full-length vasohibin-1 cDNA in RPE-J, the internal vasohibin-1 showed less VEGF expression than that of control vector-transduced RPE-J. In summary, vasohibin-1 showed opposite results as that of VEGF on the RPE-J, especially under hypoxic condition.

Keywords

Vasohibin VEGF Retinal pigment epithelium Hypoxia Cell dynamics Cobalt chloride 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported in part by grants from Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research 20592030, 21592214 from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan and Suzuken Memorial Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yumi Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Nobuhiro Nagai
    • 1
  • Hideyuki Onami
    • 1
  • Norihiro Kumasaka
    • 1
  • Ryosuke Wakusawa
    • 1
  • Hikaru Sonoda
    • 2
  • Yasufumi Sato
    • 3
  • Toshiaki Abe
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Clinical Cell Therapy, United Center for Advanced Research and Translational Medicine (ART)Tohoku University Graduate School of MedicineMiyagiJapan
  2. 2.Discovery Research LaboratoriesShionogi and Co. LtdOsakaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Vascular Biology, Institute of Development, Aging, and CancerTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineMiyagiJapan

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