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Resilience in Schools and Curriculum Design

  • Nan Henderson
Chapter

Abstract

Building on her successful work as a lecturer on school resilience, the author shows through case examples how important schools are to fostering resilience among children and youth. The nature of that school environment will influence everything from a child’s academic success, to the safety they experience, and their capacity for social and emotional well-being.

Keywords

Protective Factor Academic Success School Climate Service Learning Life Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Resiliency In ActionPaso RoblesUSA

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