The Influence of Sample Thickness on the DCDC Fracture Test

  • Christian Nielsen
  • Alireza V. Amirkhizi
  • Sia Nemat-Nasser
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

The double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) fracture test uses axial compression to drive stable cracks in glasses and brittle polymers. The cracks are generated by regions of tension in a rectangular column of material containing a central hole. The observed relationship between crack length and the applied axial stress is fitted with a two-dimensional finite element model to estimate fracture toughness. The model is applied to previous DCDC experimental results for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) samples of varying thicknesses. Both plane stress and plane strain cases are considered. Three dimensional finite element models of the DCDC test indicate plane stress analysis is the most applicable condition and suggest explanations for the effect of sample thickness.

Keywords

DCDC PMMA fracture healing toughness finite element 

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References

  1. 1.
    Janssen C, ‘Specimen for fracture mechanics studies on glass’, 10th International Congress on Glass, Kyoto Japan, Ceramic Society of Japan, 1974.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Plaisted T, Amirkhizi AV, and Nemat-Nasser S, ‘Compression-induced axial crack propagation in DCDC polymer samples: experiments and modeling’, Int J Fract, 141, 447–457, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nielsen C, Amirkhizi AV, and Nemat-Nasser S, ‘Geometric effects in DCDC fracture experiments’, SEM Annual Conference & Exhibition on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Albuquerque New Mexico USA, Society for Experimental Mechanics, 2009.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Businees Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Nielsen
    • 1
  • Alireza V. Amirkhizi
    • 1
  • Sia Nemat-Nasser
    • 1
  1. 1.Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Dept of Mechanical and Aerospace EngrUniversity of California at San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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