The Status and Potential of Central Solar Heating Plants with Seasonal Storage: An International Report

  • Charles A. Bankston
Part of the Advances in Solar Energy book series (AISE, volume 4)

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to acquaint the U.S. technical community with the activities, developments and technical advances that have taken place internationally in the utilization of large-scale seasonal storage of thermal energy to enhance the performance and economy of solar heating systems. It describes recent work and work in progress and cites some of the important technical and economic findings obtained to date, but it is not intended to provide either a definitive assessment of the technology, which would be premature, nor a detailed academic treatment of any of the many facets of technology that are relevant to such systems.

A brief description of the concepts, configurations and potential benefits of solar systems with seasonal storage is followed by a review of major projects and studies that have been reported by researchers in 12 countries. These project reviews describe the system or study, identify its unique or unusual characteristics, and cite the most important findings or expectations. The review of projects is followed by an assessment of the technical and economic status of the various aspects of central solar heating systems with seasonal storage.

A major emphasis of recent investigations has been the numerical modeling of the complex heat and mass transfer processes in the geological structures that constitute the storage systems of interest or their environs. These efforts have been relatively successful in sites where the geological structure and its boundary conditions can be well defined. The synthesis, analysis, control and operation of optimal systems of solar collectors, thermal energy storage and energy conversion devices have also received theoretical and experimental attention.

Successful systems have been designed, built, and operated and some approaches are nearing commercial status in a few countries, but many potential viable configurations have not been studied in depth.

Keywords

Anisotropy Manifold Total Heat Foam Sandstone 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles A. Bankston

There are no affiliations available

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