Biomass for Fuel and Food

A Parallel Necessity
  • D. O. Hall
  • P. J. de Groot
Part of the Advances in Solar Energy book series (AISE, volume 4)

Abstract

Section I published in Volume 3 of this series dealt with aspects of biomass energy: its often unrecognized importance, particularly for rural peoples in developing countries; its use by and potential for industrial countries; the part it can and could play in the replacement of liquid fossil fuels; and the problems and potential for production of biomass fuels. We showed that for many people, acquiring fuels is now a serious problem, and we argued that scarcity of biomass energy is potentially a greater long term threat to their well-being than shortage of food. We now attempt to justify this view.

Keywords

Europe Hydrocarbon Marketing Photosynthesis Caffeinated 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. O. Hall
  • P. J. de Groot

There are no affiliations available

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