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Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Neonatal Ruminant

  • Raymond Clifford Noble
  • John Herbert Shand
Part of the Advances in Nutritional Research book series (ANUR, volume 4)

Abstract

In spite of the rapid advances that have been made in both biochemical and physiological techniques in recent years, the enclosed environment in which the fetus exists still provides an area of biological investigation that poses many unsolved questions. Without doubt, the relationship between the lipid metabolism of the fetus and that of its mother, in particular the part played by the mother in the supply of lipids during uterine development, is an area of investigation in which extreme contradictions exist. For instance, although fetal lipids may accumulate either by de novo synthesis within the fetal tissues themselves or from the maternal circulation through transfer across the placenta, the relative quantitative importance of the two processes in the provision of lipids to the developing fetus still remains an area of considerable doubt. The exceptions to this are, of course, the essential fatty acids for which there is an obligatory placental transfer in all mammalian species. Until recently it was generally accepted that lipids did not cross the placenta in significant amounts. However, the acceptance of the idea that the fetus largely relied upon its own ability to synthesize lipids was questioned with the recognition that the least abundant of the maternal plasma lipid components, the unesterified fatty acids, could provide a major Dart of the lipid requirement of the fetus.

Keywords

Brown Adipose Tissue Essential Fatty Acid Maternal Plasma Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency Fetal Lamb 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond Clifford Noble
    • 1
  • John Herbert Shand
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryThe Hannah Research InstituteAyrScotland

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