Fracture Toughness of 25Mn Austenitic Steel Weldments at 4 K

  • Y. W. Cheng
  • H. I. McHenry
  • P. N. Li
  • T. Inoue
  • T. Ogawa
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 30)

Abstract

In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the study of replacing nickel with manganese in steels for cryogenic applications.1–2 The driving force behind this interest stems from the relative price of manganese and nickel. Nickel is an important element in steels for cryogenic applications, such as 5% nickel steel, 9% nickel steel, and the AISI 300-series austenitic stainless steels.

Keywords

Nickel Carbide Welding Manganese Helium 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. W. Cheng
    • 1
  • H. I. McHenry
    • 1
  • P. N. Li
    • 1
  • T. Inoue
    • 2
  • T. Ogawa
    • 2
  1. 1.National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Nippon Steel CorporationKawasakiJapan

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