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Fracture Mechanics Parameters for an Iron-13% Chromium-19% Manganese Stainless Steel and its Welds at Cryogenic Temperatures

  • R. L. Tobler
  • H. I. McHenry
  • R. P. Reed
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 24)

Abstract

A weldable austenitic stainless steel for liquefied natural gas tankage applications has been developed in the USSR. In the United States, ferritic 9% nickel alloy steels and 5083-0 aluminum are used for similar applications. The USSR alloy composition, Fe-13%Cr-19%Mn-0.2%N-0.8%Ni, has a low nickel content. Substantial amounts of nickel are traditionally required in ferrous alloys to resist low-temperature embrittlement. The substitution of nitrogen and manganese for nickel results in a relatively high-strength austenitic alloy.

Keywords

Stress Intensity Factor Fatigue Crack Growth Fusion Zone Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Resistance Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notation

a

average value of crack length, measured from load line

A

area under load-displacement curve, to point where test was terminated

b

uncracked ligament of specimen (b = Wa)

B

thickness of compact or bend specimen

BM

base metal

C

fatigue crack growth rate equation coefficient

da/dN

fatigue crack growth rate

E

Young’s modulus

FZ

fusion zone of weld

HAZ

heat-affected zone of weld

J

J-integral; the parameter proportional to the amount of energy required to extend a crack

JIC

critical value of J at initiation of crack extension

K

elastic stress intensity factor

KIC(J)

critical stress intensity factor and plane strain fracture toughness as estimated from J IC

Kmaxf

maximum stress intensity factor used in fatigue cracking

LT

designation for crack growth in the transverse direction

M

moment applied to bend specimen

N

number of load cycles

n

exponent of fatigue crack growth equation

P

load

R

stress ratio

S

span dimension for three point bend specimen

TL

designation for crack growth in the rolling direction

TS

designation for crack growth in the thickness direction

W

width of compact or bend specimen

Y

K calibration function

Greek symbols

δ

displacement

Δa

average value of crack extension in J test

ΔK

stress intensity factor range in fatigue cycle, ΔK = K maxK min

σf

flow stress; the average value of the material’s uniaxial yield and tensile stresses

ν

Poisson’s ratio

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References

  1. 1.
    J. P. Bruner and D. A. Sarno, “A Comparison of Three Steels for Cryogenic Service,” paper presented at the Soviet-American Seminar on Applied Problems of Low-Temperature Materials and the Manufacture of Welded Cryogenic Structures, Kiev, USSR, October 12–14, 1976.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Tobler
    • 1
  • H. I. McHenry
    • 1
  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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