Developmental Psychopathology and Incompetence in Childhood

Suggestions for Intervention
  • Dante Cicchetti
  • Sheree Toth
  • Marcy Bush
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 11)

Abstract

Despite the fact that it has been only over the course of the past two decades that developmental psychopathology has emerged as a new interdisciplinary science (Achenbach, in press; Cicchetti, 1984a, 1984b; Rutter & Garmezy, 1983; Sroufe & Rutter, 1984), it nevertheless has longstanding roots within a number of disciplines (Cicchetti, 1984b, in press; Gollin, 1984). Historically, a number of eminent scientists, theoreticians, and researchers have adopted the premise that knowledge about normal and abnormal development can inform each other.

Keywords

Depression Income Schizophrenia Coherence Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dante Cicchetti
    • 1
  • Sheree Toth
    • 2
  • Marcy Bush
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychology and PsychiatryUniversity of Rochester, and Mt. Hope Family CenterRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Rochester, and Mt. Hope Family CenterRochesterUSA

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