Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Children

  • Philip C. Kendall
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 4)

Abstract

In view of the relatively large body of literature on cognitive-behavioral intervention for adult disorders, a few brief comments about these approaches are in order. Generally speaking, systematic rational restructuring (Goldfried, 1979), stress inoculation training (Meichenbaum, 1977; Novaco, 1979), cognitive therapy for depression (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979), and rational emotive therapy (Ellis & Grieger, 1977) are the most clearly delineated cases of adult cognitive-behavior therapy.

Keywords

Placebo Depression Coherence Assure Tate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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