Institutional Treatment of Severely Disturbed Children: Fact, Possibility, or Nonsequitur?

  • Raymond G. Romanczyk
  • Janet A. Kistner
  • Daniel B. Crimmins
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (volume 3)

Abstract

A significant problem facing many thousands of children, their parents, and society, is the treatment of severe childhood psychopathology and mental deficiency. The magnitude of this problem is not only a function of the number of severely disturbed children,1 but also of the degree of their impairment. That is, these are children for whom the normal day-to-day environments of the home and school are inadequate to teach simple social, language, self-help, and cognitive skills. Thus, many, or indeed the majority, of severely disturbed children lead very impoverished lives and have an extremely poor prognosis with respect to functioning independently or semiindependently in the community as adults. Most will require an intensively supervised, sheltered, living environment for their entire lives.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Phenyl Beach Expense Resi 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond G. Romanczyk
    • 1
  • Janet A. Kistner
    • 1
  • Daniel B. Crimmins
    • 1
  1. 1.Children’s Unit, Department of PsychologyState University of New YorkBinghamtonUSA

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