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Pragmatics and Language Development

  • Betty Hart
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (volume 3)

Abstract

In the study of language, as in the study of any other phenomenon, it is necessary to define the nature and limits of the subject of study. But defining an area of study involves taking a point of view, and associating it with historical and contemporary views that support or contradict it. The theoretical stand implied by definition, then, tends to determine the kinds of research undertaken, and the interpretation given to the results. The audience to which the research interpretation is directed tends to reinforce the approach, and to further determine what will be the issues of concern. The seemingly widely divergent views of the be-haviorist and the psycholinguist, and their very different approaches to research, are the result of important differences in their definitions of what language is and what development means.

Keywords

Language Development Language Acquisition Apply Behavior Analysis Consequent Event Response Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betty Hart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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