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The Assessment and Treatment of Children’s Fears

  • Suzanne Bennett Johnson
  • Barbara G. Melamed
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 2)

Abstract

While fear is a necessary and often “healthy” response to a wide variety of situations, at times it can become so debilitating as to be maladaptive. Careful distinctions involving terms such as fear, phobia, and anxiety are not always made. However, there seems to be some general consensus that fear connotes a differentiated response to a specific object or situation. Anxiety is a more diffuse, less focused response, perhaps best described as apprehension without apparent cause. A phobia is a special form of fear that (1) is out of proportion to the demands of the situation, (2) cannot be explained or reasoned away, (3) is beyond voluntary control, and (4) leads to avoidance of the feared situation (Marks, 1969).

Keywords

Test Anxiety Apply Behavior Analysis Dental Anxiety Abnormal Psychology Modeling Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne Bennett Johnson
    • 1
  • Barbara G. Melamed
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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