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Uses of Modeling in Child Treatment

  • Karen D. Kirkland
  • Mark H. Thelen

Abstract

Learning by observation and imitation of other people’s behavior is an everyday affair for most children and a central process in the acquisition of a wide variety of new behaviors. Extensive research has shown that modeling is an effective way for children to acquire, strengthen, and weaken behaviors. Given frequent naturalistic observation of imitation among children and the voluminous experimental literature on the topic, it is not surprising that modeling is a common term in developmental psychology. The next step that occurred in the evolution of the field was the application of modeling techniques to the treatment of clinical problems with children. A number of practitioners and researchers have begun to bridge the gap between the experimental and the applied realms by demonstrating that modeling is an effective strategy for the treatment of a variety of childhood disorders.

Keywords

Autistic Child Multiple Model Social Withdrawal Apply Behavior Analysis Child Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen D. Kirkland
    • 1
  • Mark H. Thelen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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