Pedophilia pp 338-377 | Cite as

The Functions of Primate Paternalism: A Cross-Species Review

  • David M. Taub

Abstract

Intrauterine gestation and the physiological adaptations of females that have allowed them to nourish neonates characterize the class Mammalia, and these characteristics have had revolutionary consequences on the evolution of social organization and mating patterns (Trivers, 1972; Brown, 1975; Maynard Smith, 1977; Wittenberger and Tilson, 1980; Williams, 1966; Gubernick and Klopfer, 1981). This physiological mechanism that allowed a female to solely and direcdy support her offspring also had dramatic effects on parent/offspring bonds (Trivers, 1972), such that the relationships between mother and child are cardinal to all mammalian social systems. An evolutionary consequence of this female capacity has been the diminution of the role of males in parental duties; indeed, so pervasive is the bond between mammalian mother and child that the term “parental behavior” has become equated with mothering. So reduced has been the role of males that the term “biparental” care has been coined to denote explicitly some parenting role for them. For example, in more than 90% of bird species, the male plays an equal role to the female in offspring nurturing, but only a very small percentage of mammals show analogous parenting behavior (Brown, 1985). However maternocentric investigations of mammalian social structure may have been historically, a new focus on the male’s role was inaugurated with the publication of Trivers’s (1972) provocative analysis of parental investment and sexual selection.

Keywords

Estrogen Cage Expense Stein Malaysia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Taub
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory Animal Breeders & Services (LABS)YemasseeUSA

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