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Depression: A Self-Presentation Formulation

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Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

The manifestations of depression—dejected mood, passivity, feelings of guilt—are easily recognizable.

Keywords

Causal Attribution Depressed Individual Depressed Subject Abnormal Psychology Depressed Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

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