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Social Contexts and Functions of Children’s Remembering

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Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

Whether we examine histories of societies or lives of individuals, we can review ample evidence of the cues that are erected to prevent forgetting. Statues, notes, and even knots can help to remind us of particular events in the past or to cue us to perform designated actions in the future. Vygotsky was interested in the socialized construction of these cultural artifacts and personal signs as mental cues that serve parallel functions in sociohistory and memory development. The “essence” in both is “purposely building” “so as not to forget.” The intentional selection of cues and mnemonic tactics to aid remembering is a developmental accomplishment that is part of higher mental functions according to Vygotsky (1978). Remembering, planning, and other forms of directed reasoning extend basic psychological processes through the use of signs and tools in the broadest sense of cognitive instruments.

Keywords

Child Development Cognitive Strategy Proximal Development Memory Skill Memory Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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