Memory in Very Young Children

  • Marvin W. Daehler
  • Carolyn Greco
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The recent flurry of research on memory in very young children has taken a long time to materialize. Numerous anecdotal descriptions detailing toddlers’ “amazing” abilities to recognize scenes or to recall events occurring days, weeks, and even months earlier seem to have been met, in the past, with a twinge of curiosity and perhaps graciously phrased platitudes such as “Yes, babies and young children can do some marvelous things.” Even so accomplished an observer as Charles Darwin was uncertain whether it was “worth mentioning” that his 3-year-old son recognized a picture of his grandfather whom he had not seen for 6 months. This child recalled a “whole string of events which had occurred whilst visiting him (the grandfather), and which certainly had never been mentioned in the interval” (Darwin, 1877; p. 291). Darwin’s apologetic comment probably indicated uncertainty about where such an observation fit in the overall scheme of intellectual development rather than a reasoned conviction that this type of data was unimportant. In fact, precisely these kinds of observations, more systematically recorded, have yielded fresh advances in our understanding of the development of memory in very young children.

Keywords

Selective Information Respiration Candy Caron Rovee 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marvin W. Daehler
  • Carolyn Greco

There are no affiliations available

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