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Ordinary Learning: Pragmatic Connections Among Children’s Beliefs, Motives, and Actions

  • Scott G. Paris
  • David R. Cross
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Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

Children’s learning is the core of their everyday experiences. The principal tasks of childhood include learning physical skills for play and work, social conventions for interaction, and cognitive understanding of the environment. These tasks require a tremendous amount of children’s time and energy and are concerns of parents, teachers, and scientists alike. Our common goals are to understand and to facilitate children’s learning because it is so vital to their education and development. In this chapter we sketch a conceptual framework of children’s learning and describe motivational factors that shape children’s acquisition and refinement of various skills. We begin with several intuitive tenets about children’s learning that help to define the scope of our inquiry and to chart the paths of our proposal. We are concerned with children’s learning that is ordinary, socialized, functional, and adventurous.

Keywords

Child Development Reading Comprehension Educational Psychology Achievement Motivation Metacognitive Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Scott G. Paris
  • David R. Cross

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