Growing Up Explained: Vygotskians Look at the Language of Causality

  • Lois Hood
  • Kathleen Fiess
  • Jeffrey Aron
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

In this chapter we examine the overall methodology1 of language development studies and present the barest outline of an approach that is fundamentally different in several respects. The historical roots of this new approach, the difficulties in implementing it, and the necessity for it are discussed. Specifically, we present an examination of structuralist approaches to children’s use of language about causality and contrast them with a dialectical, sociocultural approach, the origins of which go back to Vygotsky’s work in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Our concerns are twofold. First, we ask how and why children become part of a “community of explainers,” a community that is both vast in number and historically specific to a particular time and culture. Second, we ask how we can study language development in a way that presupposes a qualitatively different kind of relationship between language and reality, namely, a dialectical one.

Keywords

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lois Hood
  • Kathleen Fiess
  • Jeffrey Aron

There are no affiliations available

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