Demographic Change in the United States, 1970 – 2050

  • Samuel H. Preston
Part of the Springer Series in Statistics book series (SBH)

Abstract

Population projections demonstrate the implications of sets of fertility, mortality, and migration rates, combined with an initial population age structure, for future population size and composition. Age-specific mortality rates are applied to project the living population forward in time; age-specific fertility rates are applied to project births. Immigrants and emigrants are typically added at the last stage. Projections make endogenous one of the most important determinants of demographic change, a population’s age structure. Populations with larger proportions over age 50, for example, have higher death rates and lower birth rates and growth rates, ceteris paribus.

Keywords

Migration Depression Europe Influenza Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel H. Preston

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