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Dominant Drusen

  • Juan Orellana
  • Alan H. Friedman

Abstract

Drusen have been described as autosomal dominant lesions. Excrescences or nodules seen on the surface of Bruch’s membrane, they may be dystrophic and familial. Characteristically, drusen located throughout the posterior pole as well as nasal to the disc for which a familial pattern can be demonstrated are commonly called dominant drusen or familial drusen. Ophthalmoscopically, they are yellow to yellow-white and are located in deep retina. They appear during the first three decades of life and are usually round. As the individual ages, the drusen may coalesce. During the fifth or sixth decade of life, a pigment epithelial detachment may occur that signals the presence of a subretinal neovascular membrane. Patients do not notice a loss of acuity until after age 40. Clinically, the number and size of the drusen increase over time.

Keywords

Retinal Pigment Epithelium Color Vision Sixth Decade Pigment Epithelial Detachment Normal Color Vision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Selected Reading

  1. Deutman AF, Jansen LMAA (1970). Dominantly inherited drusen of Bruch’s membrane. Br J Ophthalmol 54: 373–382PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Farkas TG, Krill AE, Sylvester VM, et al (1971). Familial and secondary drusen: histologic and functional correlations. Trans Am Acad Ophthalmol Otolaryngol 75: 333–343PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Gass JDM (1973). Drusen and disciform macular detachment and degeneration. Arch Ophthalmol 90: 206–217PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Orellana
    • 1
  • Alan H. Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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