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High Resolution Gravity Models Combining Terrestrial and Satellite Data

  • Richard H. Rapp
  • Nikolaos K. Pavlis
  • Yan Ming Wang
Conference paper
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 110)

Abstract

Spherical harmonic expansions to degree 360 have been developed that combine satellite potential coefficient information, terrestrial gravity data, satellite altimeter information as a direct tracking data type and topographic information. These models define improved representations of the Earth’s gravitational potential beyond that available from just satellite or terrestrial data. The development of the degree 360 models, however, does not imply a uniform accuracy in the determination of the gravity field as numerous geographic areas are devoid of terrestrial data or the resolution of such data is limited to, for example, 100km.

This paper will consider theoretical and numerical questions related to the combination of the various data types. Various models of the combination process are discussed with a discussion of various correction terms for the different models. Various sources of gravity data will be described. The new OSU91 360 model will be discussed with comparisons made to previous 360 models and to other potential coefficient models that are complete to degree 50. Future directions in high degree potential coefficient models will be discussed.

Keywords

Gravity Anomaly Gravity Data Altimeter Data Geopotential Model Geoid Undulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard H. Rapp
    • 1
  • Nikolaos K. Pavlis
    • 1
  • Yan Ming Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geodetic Science and SurveyingThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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